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Chromatic Harmonies
Dominant Seventh Chord
How to Teach Macro Analysis
Introduction to the Macro Technique
Leading Tone Seventh Chords
Modulation
More to think about
Nondominant Seventh Chords
Secondary Dominants
Slurs

Harmonic Progression

The previous page illustrated harmonic motion in cadences. Harmonic motion occurs not only at cadence points, but throughout a piece. Many common harmonic patterns can be derived from the following progression built of consecutive, ascending fourths or descending fifths. Note that both progressions start and finish on the tonic.

In major keys:
I - IV - vii° - iii - vi - ii - V - I
In natural minor:
i - iv - VII - III - VI - ii° - v - i

All of the following common progressions result when certain specific chords are selected from this series.

I - IV - vii° - iii - vi - ii - V - I
I - V - I = I-V-I
I - ii - V - I = I-ii-V-I
I -IV V - I = I-IV-V-I
I - vi - ii - V - I = I-vi-ii-V-I

Every motion by ascending fourth or descending fifth represents harmonic progression and should be slurred. The complete progression given above would look like this using macro analysis:

harm picture
 I IV vii° iii vi ii V I

Notice that slurs go on the letter names, and inversions (if necessary) go on the roman numerals. You may have noticed that one segment of this progression does not include an ascending perfect fourth. A tritone occurs between the second and third chord of the series. One tritone will occur at this point in any diatonic progression in a major key, and therefore also receives a slur. A diatonic progression that completes a full circle appears below.

Handel: Suite (Partita) in G Major (G 211-217)

harm2 picture

 
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