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Dominant Seventh Chord
Harmonic Progression
How to Teach Macro Analysis
Introduction to the Macro Technique
Leading Tone Seventh Chords
Modulation
More to think about
Nondominant Seventh Chords
Secondary Dominants
Slurs

Chromatic Harmonies

Macro analysis provides the same advantage in identifying chromatic harmonies as it does for secondary dominants. By analyzing the letter names of the chords first, it is easier to pinpoint harmonies that are not diatonic. Like a secondary dominant, a chromatic harmony also departs from the diatonic chords of the key for an instant. If you spot a letter name that is not a part of the original key, you may be looking at a chromatic harmony. However, remember that you may also be looking at the beginnings of a modulation, or a secondary dominant. This is all a part of what makes the study of music so interesting. Hopefully, you will find that using macro analysis makes your search through all of the different harmonic possibilities a little easier. Macro analysis is also a very flexible system. You may wish to add your own symbols for other types of harmonic progressions, such as third relationships, or any of the other chromatic harmonies presented below.

All of the various chromatic harmonies can be incorporated into macro analysis. Strategies for including these harmonies in this system are as follows:

Borrowed Chords

NotationMeaning
Letter name Letter name represents quality of chord.
Slur If the borrowed chord is substituted for a harmony that is in a position to receive a slur, the borrowed chord letter name is slurred also.
Roman numeral Roman numerals should also correspond with the specific type of borrowed chord.

Ninth, Eleventh, and Thirteenth Chords

NotationMeaning
Letter name Letter name represents quality of chord, and is followed by a 9, 11, or 13 as needed.
Slur Ninth, eleventh and thirteenth chords are slurred like any other harmony that is in a position to receive a slur.
Roman numeral Roman numerals include a 9, 11, or 13.

Neapolitan 6th Chord

NotationMeaning
Letter name Letter name represents quality of chord.
Slur The Neapolitan 6th chord is slurred like any other harmony if it is in a position to receive a slur.
Roman numeral The symbol N6 should be used on the Roman numeral line.

Augmented 6th Chords

NotationMeaning
Letter name These chords are NOT represented by a letter name, but rather by the Augmented 6th chord symbols, It6, Gr6, and Fr6.
Slur These chords are not slurred.
Roman numeral The symbols It6, Gr6 and Fr6 should be used on the Roman numeral line.

Altered Dominants

NotationMeaning
Letter name Letter name represents quality of chord. Other symbols that represent the type of alteration should be included with the letter name.
Slur An altered dominant is slurred like any other harmony if it is in a position to receive a slur.
Roman numeral Roman numeral includes other symbols that represent the type of alteration.

Chromatic Mediants

NotationMeaning
Letter name Letter name represents quality of chord.
Slur Due to the way a chromatic mediant moves, it will usually NOT be slurred. However, If the chromatic mediant does occur in a position that would require a slur, it can be slurred.
Roman numeral Roman numerals follow the traditional format for chromatic mediants.
 
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